Archives of Neuroscience

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Category-Related Brain Activation to Represent Semantic Organization

Ahmad Reza Khatoonabadi 1 , * , Sadra Sadeh 2 , Antonello Grippo 3 , 4 , Behrooz Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari 5 and Mahsa Saadati 6
Authors Information
1 Speech Therapy Department, School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
2 University of Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany
3 Neuroscience Department, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy
4 Fond. Don C. Gnocchi ONLUS, IRCCS, Florence, Italy
5 Department of Performing Arts, University of Tehran, Tehran, IR Iran
6 National Population Studies and Comprehensive Management Institute, Tehran, IR Iran
Article information
  • Archives of Neuroscience: January 01, 2016, 3 (1); e24865
  • Published Online: January 16, 2016
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • Received: November 1, 2014
  • Revised: February 28, 2015
  • Accepted: October 6, 2015
  • DOI: 10.5812/archneurosci.24865

To Cite: Khatoonabadi A R, Sadeh S, Grippo A, Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari B, Saadati M. Category-Related Brain Activation to Represent Semantic Organization, Arch Neurosci. 2016 ; 3(1):e24865. doi: 10.5812/archneurosci.24865.

Abstract
Copyright © 2016, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Background
2. Objectives
3. Materials and Methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
Acknowledgements
Footnote
References
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